Urban landscapes: LRT light

CROWFOOT LRT STATION, CALGARY, ALBERTA, CANADA

Blue-hour exterior light cast the modern architecture and warm interior light of this station in the best possible way. And the stairs to the lower level meant I could try various compositions from dramatically different viewpoints. Nikon D7100, tripod, 18-70 mm. lens.

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Calgary LRT web1

Natural landscapes: spring ice

ICICLES AND WATER AT BIG HILL SPRINGS PROVINCIAL PARK, ALBERTA, CANADA

April is a time of transition in much of Canada. While the days are often warm and the snow generally gone, there are often days of cold temperatures and snow. A day of such weather took me to this provincial park about a half-hour drive from my home in Calgary. I hoped to find ice and water combinations and, as you can see, I wasn’t disappointed.
The challenge here was achieving a long exposure (to make the flowing water silky) with the ice not moving. Several good compositions were tossed out for this reason, but the photo you’re looking at here is a success. Nikon D7100, tripod, 70-300 mm. zoom lens, polarizing filter, neutral density (darkening) filter.

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Spring Ice Canada

 

Urban landscapes: flowers amidst the skyscrapers

SPRING TULIP, VANCOUVER, BRITISH COLUMBIA

This charming bloom is part of a small tulip garden in the midst of this western Canadian city’s soaring skyscrapers. The green stripe attracted my attention; a shallow depth of field made the background complementary, rather than competing. Nikon D90, tripod, polarizing filter.

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Vancouver tulip

Natural landscapes: spring at the bluffs

MORNING AT SCARBOROUGH BLUFFS, TORONTO, ONTARIO

These bluffs are one of the most notable natural features in the Greater Toronto Area, Canada’s most populous region. The view is wonderful from the top, but on this spring morning, I was blessed to be at the bottom with almost no wind. Thus the impressive reflections. Nikon D50, tripod, polarizing filter.

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Toronto Scarborough Bluffs

Urban landscapes: wet dawn

AWAITING DAYBREAK, NANAIMO, BRITISH COLUMBIA

As you can see, there wasn’t going to be a spectacular sunrise at this harbour on Vancouver Island. In fact, it was raining as I made this long exposure. But the scene has its own charms, don’t you think?  Nikon D90, tripod.

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Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

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Nanaimo Vancouver Island

Urban landscapes: Geese and the nuclear plant

LAKE ONTARIO GEESE, ROUGE PARK, SCARBOROUGH, ONTARIO

A wonderful spring sunrise in the east end of Toronto, Canada’s largest city. That’s the Pickering Nuclear Power Plant in the background. Nikon D50, tripod.

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Rouge Park, Toronto, geese, Pickering nuclear plant

Rural landscapes: the start of spring

FOOTHILLS MORNING SOUTH OF CALGARY, ALBERTA, CANADA

The southern half of this western Canadian province is more than 3,000 feet above sea level. As a result, spring comes late and camping isn’t comfortable until June. But even before the green arrives, you can see there are still many beautiful scenes to photograph. Nikon D90, tripod, polarizing filter.

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Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my coffeetable book, “Frank King’s Southern Alberta“: http://bit.ly/1oUzd4ACanada Alberta prairies spring

Rural landscapes: sleep that knows no waking

EVENING AT THE CEMETERY, CARBON, ALBERTA, CANADA

In Alberta, it’s rare to find a rural cemetery that isn’t surrounded by trees. So when I came upon this place, I was eager to explore it for potential compositions. This scene, with glorious evening sun and an epic view, was just one of the compositions I found. Nikon D7100, tripod, polarizing filter.

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Canada cemetary praires

Rural landscapes: the end of winter

PRAIRIE SELF-PORTRAIT, NEAR AIRDRIE, ALBERTA, CANADA

Man, I love my red winter coat. It’s been useful in almost a half-dozen compositions just in the last few months. When I decided to put me into this scene, I thought it might work to keep me in colour and make the rest of the solitary prairie landscape black and white. Works pretty well, eh?  Nikon D7100, tripod, polarizing filter.

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Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

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Prairies Canada Alberta spring black and white

Urban landscapes: in the midst of the Arc

CHINOOK ARC, CALGARY, ALBERTA, CANADA

This interactive sculpture, completed last year, sits just south of Calgary’s downtown in Barb Scott Park. Designed by Joe O’Connell and Blessing Hancock, the idea is to echo the streetcar line that once encircled the area as well as the dramatic Chinook Arch cloud pattern that dramatically changes winter temperatures in Calgary.
Visitors to Chinook Arc have control over the lighting through an optical sensor that projects the movements and colours it sees onto the sculpture. Visitors can wave their hands, move colored objects or play a movie on their cell phones in order to create their own light sequences. It’s very cool — so cool that I decided to get into the photo.  :-)  Nikon D7100, tripod.

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Want to buy this picture? Email me and I’ll make it happen! (fdking@hotmail.com).

Check out my coffeetable book, “MOMENTS OF LIGHT: Thirty Years of Photography”: http://bit.ly/JTNnMX

Chinook Arc Calgary

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